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mrprunes
WATERING LAWN IN DROUGHT CONDITION
by mrprunes 
July 24th, 2012
Kris Wetherbee
Hi Ed. It's not so much about the actual cut as it is about how much you cut and the condition of your lawn. Cutting a "dry" lawn too frequently during high temperatures can be stressful, and severe cutbacks are especially stressful. Mowing high puts much less stress on your lawn, promotes deep roots and helps reduce moisture loss. A good rule of thumb is to never remove more than one-third of the blade length at a time, and to mow the grass at your highest setting. (About 2 1/2 to 3 inches is best for most turfgrasses.) Ideally it's best to give your lawn about an inch of water per week. Otherwise the grass may thin, decline or even die. Bottom line is this: if you choose not to water during drought periods and your grass is going brown and dormant, then hold back on mowing. Otherwise, mowing high and mowing often will help a lawn to stand up to drought and even thrive in difficult conditions.
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by Kris Wetherbee |
July 24th, 2012
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Manage My Life
Watering potted plants
by Manage My Life 
June 26th, 2013
Manage My Life
I can understand how important it is to have the right information for your plants. The information that Dezeray provide is very good. I use the drip water irrigation myself. This keeps the soil moist without over watering the plants. I also use this while I am at home, because of this. It saves me time and I don't have to remember to water the plants, I just check the water in the bottle about once every two weeks. I hope this helps. If you need further assistance, please reply to this thread. Thank you for using Manage My Life.
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by Manage My Life |
June 26th, 2013
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Manage My Life
We are watering daily, but our lawn is still turning brown in the late summer heat. What can we do?
by Manage My Life 
August 17th, 2008
Manage My Life
If you live in the south this is fairly common. It is usually in areas of the lawn that get a lot of direct sun. The grass needs some fertilizer.

Scotts and probably some other companies make a summer fertilizer for southern lawns. It won't burn the soil and releases a range of nutrients that the grass needs this time of year.

If you can you should increase the amount of water on the areas that get a lot of sun.
by Manage My Life |
August 20th, 2008
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