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Manage My Life
oil burner model # 3K1006
by Manage My Life 
December 18th, 2010
Sam A
Thank you for your question.

I can understand your concern for the burner not lighting and getting heat.

I am sorry it has taken so long to answer you.

On the control box I believe is tells you what to do in the case of this happening.

Hold the red rest button for 30 seconds until the light flashes.

Please check your owner's to make sure you control is like this one.

I will send a picture of the one I think you have.

I hope this will help.

Thank you for using Manage My Life.
by Sam A |
December 20th, 2010
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Manage My Life
Why do vents on an oil burner corrode?
by Manage My Life 
April 26th, 2007
Manage My Life
Start-up condensation, with a cold heat exchanger, is the typical reason the vent corrodes. Condensation may also occur if the burner is undersized. Because the vent is specified for a certain nozzle size, if the service technician downsizes the nozzle during a service, you can end up with an oversized vent.

The underlying reason for the corrosion of the vent from condensation is the sulfur content of the combustion gases. Although the vent is stainless steel, the sulfur creates sulfuric acid, which attacks the steel.

The implication of the corroded vent is, of course, spillage of combustion gases into the home.

Look along the entire length of the vent for obvious surface rusting or perforations. Do not probe the flue with a screwdriver when looking at rusted areas. This will cause immediate spillage of combustion gases because of the high flue pressure.
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by Manage My Life |
April 26th, 2007
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Manage My Life
What causes incomplete combustion with an oil burner?
by Manage My Life 
April 26th, 2007
Manage My Life
This condition may be caused by

a worn or dirty nozzle

a partially clogged oil filter

dirty fan inlets

poor burner adjustment

poor oil quality or delivery

These are all maintenance issues. More serious issues include 6. a worn pump 7. refractory problems

Incomplete combustion causes inefficient performance and soot buildup in the heat exchanger and chimney. This can be a life safety issue if left long enough. Chimney or heat exchanger blockage with soot buildup is a common occurrence on neglected systems. This can spill combustion gases (usually containing carbon monoxide) into the house.

Observe the burner flame for significant black flame tips or smoke. Any time this is seen, you should recommend servicing of the unit, including cleaning the heat exchanger passages and the chimney. Smoke may mean

inadequate air

wrong nozzle

defective refractory

Delayed ignition is a variation on incomplete combustion. Watch for delayed, sometimes violent-ignition. This is usually a spark igniter problem. It can also be related to a nozzle, pump or air supply problem.
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by Manage My Life |
April 26th, 2007
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Manage My Life
How far should an oil burner be from combustibles?
by Manage My Life 
April 26th, 2007
Manage My Life
This is rarely an installation problem, but is typically caused by storage put here by the homeowner or construction done by the homeowner around the furnace. Many burners require a clearance of 24 inches to combustibles. The burner should be on a non-combustible floor, or special provisions are required.

The lack of combustible clearance may result in a fire if something goes wrong at the burner.

Make sure there is no storage piled around or close to the burner. If the furnace has been enclosed in a room, make sure that combustible walls (including drywall) are at least 24 inches from the burner.
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by Manage My Life |
April 26th, 2007
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Manage My Life
What causes incomplete combustion in an oil burner?
by Manage My Life 
April 26th, 2007
Manage My Life
Causes include the following maintenance issues:

a worn or dirty nozzle

a partially clogged oil filter

dirty fan inlets

poor burner adjustment

poor oil delivery

Additional possible causes include

a worn pump

refractory problems

Incomplete combustion causes inefficient performance and soot buildup in the heat exchanger core and chimney. This can be a life safety issue if left long enough. Chimney or heat exchanger core blockage from soot buildup is a common occurrence on neglected systems. This can spill combustion gases (usually containing carbon monoxide) into the house.

Observe the burner flame for significant black flame tips or smoke. Any time this is seen, you should recommend servicing of the unit, including a cleaning of the flue passage and the chimney. Smoke may mean

inadequate air

wrong nozzle

defective refractory

This is a variation of incomplete combustion. Watch for delayed, sometimes violent, ignition. This is usually a spark igniter problem. It can also be related to a nozzle, pump or air supply problem.
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by Manage My Life |
April 26th, 2007
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Manage My Life
Why would the oil burner on my water heater not be working?
by Manage My Life 
April 26th, 2007
Manage My Life
Causes include

malfunction of any of the various burner components (pump, fan, ignition system, primary control, burner motor nozzle)

electrical power to the water heater is off

clog in the fuel line

leak from the fuel line

empty oil tank

defective controls

The implication is no hot water.

Flow hot water at a faucet to test the operation of the water heater. The oil burner should ignite within a few minutes.

If the burner does not ignite immediately, check the electric power switch. In most homes with basements, the switch is near the bottom of the basement stairs. Most codes require the switch to be between the stairs and the appliance. The switch may be a conventional light switch or a fused disconnect. If the switch is on, check the fuses or breaker panel.

If there is electricity, but there is still no response from burner, check whether there is oil in the tank.

If the tank is not empty, the problem is likely in the fuel line or at one of the burner components.

If you are technically inclined, you can check the refractory for pooling oil. The presence of oil may indicate the pump is working but the fan or igniter is not. Do not reset the controller if there is a puddle of oil in the refractory, as an explosion can result. If you can't see inside, don't reset the controller. The nozzle may be clogged. You can try the reset button on the primary controller once to attempt ignition again,

if you are sure there is no oil puddle

.
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by Manage My Life |
April 26th, 2007
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Manage My Life
What can make an oil burner become noisy and vibrate?
by Manage My Life 
April 26th, 2007
Manage My Life
The rotating parts of oil burners can go out of balance as parts (motor and fan bearings, pump bearings) wear or get dirty. This can also be a coupling alignment problem.

Thumping and rumbling at the burner may be a nozzle problem. Service people often replace the nozzle to cure the problem. Noisy operation may result from air in the inlet line.

There is no short-term implication of noisy burners, other than annoyance. However, vibration will accelerate the deterioration of the burner components.

Run the burner and note the noise. Oil burners should produce a steady drone. It is often possible to hear the oil burner noise throughout the entire house. Any uneven or high-pitched noises coming from the burner should be noted. Place the back of your right hand on the top of the

ignition transformer

. This is typically a black box roughly 5 inches by 4 inches by 4 inches tall, usually at the top of the burner. It converts house current at 120 volts to very high voltage, so a spark can be generated at the electrode. Using the back of your hand may save your life if there is an electrical problem causing the transformer casing to be energized. The burner unit should have a slight, steady vibration while running. Dramatic vibration is a cause for concern.
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by Manage My Life |
April 26th, 2007
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Manage My Life
Why would my oil burner suddenly become noisy?
by Manage My Life 
April 26th, 2007
Manage My Life
The rotating parts of oil burners can go out of balance as parts (motor and fan bearings, pump bearings) wear or get dirty. This can also be a coupling alignment problem. Thumping and rumbling at the burner may be a nozzle problem. Service people often replace the nozzle and cure the problem. Noisy operation may result from air in the inlet line.

There is no short-term implication of noisy burners, other than annoyance. However, vibration will accelerate the deterioration of the burner components.

Run the burner and note the noise. Oil burners should produce a fairly loud, steady drone. It is often possible to hear the oil burner noise throughout the entire house. Any uneven or high-pitched noises coming from the burner should be noted.

Place your hand on the top of the

ignition transformer

. This is typically a black box roughly 5 inches by 4 inches by 4 inches tall. It's usually at the top of the burner. It converts house current at 120 volts to very high voltage, so a spark can be generated at the electrode. The burner unit should have a slight, steady vibration while running. Dramatic vibration is a cause for concern.
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by Manage My Life |
April 26th, 2007
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Manage My Life
Would changing an oil burner to natural gas burner make sense with respect to saving money?
by Manage My Life 
May 5th, 2008
Tags: Gas Grills, HVAC
Manage My Life
There are a number of issues to consider when making a decision of this nature. I can't speculate on future price of fuel oil or natural gas. The only certainty is that the efficiency and recovery time of an oil burner is much higher than that of natural gas.

The best course of action is to seek multiple estimates from reputable companies and listen to the recommendations of the technicians.
by Manage My Life |
May 7th, 2008
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jessica carmosino
spilled cooking oil under gas burner on stovetop, now burning the finish off the cap when turned on...how to fix it?
by jessica carmosino 
February 1st, 2012
Manage My Life
Did you get the cooking oil that was spilled cleaned up? If you go to

Parts Direct

you can see a parts diagram of the range. This should help you know what parts you will need to remove to clean the pan under the burner.

If you have questions, reply on this thread and include the model of the range. I will be glad to help.
by Manage My Life |
February 2nd, 2012
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