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Glenn Guffey
Pruning roses
by Glenn Guffey 
April 14th, 2012
Kris Wetherbee
You can prune to remove dead or damaged wood at any time, but the best time to do any heavy pruning is in mid- to late-winter for warmer climates, or early spring in colder climates. Trim the bush down by one half to two thirds its original height. (The bush will eventually triple its height after pruning.) Every second or third year, remove some of the older, less productive canes at the base of the plant to encourage better and more productive blooms.
by Kris Wetherbee |
April 18th, 2012
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Manage My Life
how can i protect my roses in winter
by Manage My Life 
June 17th, 2010
Manage My Life
One of the ways to protect roses for the winter is to be sure they go completely dormant. To accomplish this, stop fertilizing early enough so growth slows down. If you live in one of the northerly climate zones...4, 5, or 6, no fertilizer should be applied after August 15. To further encourage dormancy, stop dead-heading or cutting flowers after October 1 and allow the plant to form hips.

There are many methods to provide winter protection for roses. The whole idea of winter protection is to keep the plant uniformly cold and frozen all winter and prevent the damaging effects of alternate freezing and thawing. Whatever method is chosen, don't begin covering plants too early. Wait until a hard killing frost has caused most of the leaves to fall. You may also want to wait until the temperature has dropped into the teens for several nights. Prior to covering, remove any foliage or other debris that might harbor disease for the next season.

Before covering, some tall roses may need minor pruning to reduce their height, and tying of the canes together to prevent wind whipping. Pruning, however, at this point should be kept to a minimum. The majority of the pruning will be done in the spring to remove dead and diseased canes.

The most common way to provide winter protection is to pile or "hill-up" a loose, well-drained soil/compost mix around and over the plant to a depth of about 10-12 inches. A variety of hilling materials can be used, but the key is to be sure that the material is well drained. Wet and cold is far more damaging than dry and cold. Also, the decisions that are made when preparing the site for roses really governs what kind of success you will have in winter survival. A rose that is planted in poorly drained soil will suffer and often not survive the winter when that same rose, planted in a well-drained site, will flourish. Soil that is used to "hill-up" plants should be brought in from outside the rose garden. Scraping up soil from around the plant can cause root injury and lessen the plant's chance for survival.

After the soil mound has frozen, the mound can be covered with evergreen boughs, hardwood leaves, or straw to help insulate and keep the soil frozen.
by Manage My Life |
June 19th, 2010
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Manage My Life
I have some roses they been infected with green insects. What I can use to treat it?
by Manage My Life 
April 6th, 2009
Manage My Life
It's important to identify the pest before you treat it, since different pests respond best to different remedies. Also, you want to be sure the insect you're seeing is actually a pest, not an innocent bystander or even beneficial insect. In your case, I can't be sure what the pests are but they might be aphids. In this case, my first defense would be to simply hose off the plant, washing the insects off the top and undersides of the leaves, focusing especially on the new growth. Do this in the morning so the foliage dries quickly in the sun. Try doing this every morning for a few days. If that doesn't control the outbreak, try spraying with insecticidal soap.
by Manage My Life |
July 8th, 2009
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Lyle W
My roses are getting really tall. Should I prune them even in late summer?
by Lyle W 
August 24th, 2010
Manage My Life
For most types or rose bushes it is best to prune in the early spring, after the last hard freeze. The cooler weather will stabilize the shrub, and encourage new growth to thrive as warmer weather approaches. If you were to do this in late summer, any new growth could be damaged by impending cold weather.

Rinse shears in alcohol before pruning. Rinse them again before moving on to another bush. This step disinfects your shears and prevents the transfer of diseases, such as black spot, between the plants.

Cut at a 45 degree angle, with the slope of the angle heading toward the center of the plant.

Seal pruning cuts with inexpensive white glue or carpenter's glue. This prevents rose boring insects from invading, and helps prevent stem diseases.

For big climbing roses, however, just after the seasonal bloom, it is OK to trim canes back just to shape the plant. Take out any long sucker canes. Trim any crossing canes that might damage other parts of the plant.
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by Manage My Life |
August 24th, 2010
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Manage My Life
I have two beautiful cut roses, and the stems are now growing leaves but no roots. Is there anyway to plant it or get a graft from them to grow?
by Manage My Life 
June 4th, 2010
Manage My Life
WOW! Thanks for the help! The better half at home will Im sure be doing this immediately. I will let you know how it goes!
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by Manage My Life |
June 4th, 2010
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Manage My Life
I have a gopher problem it has been going on for a few years. It has ate all my 30 year old trees all my roses and all I have planted. It is driving me BONKERS
by Manage My Life 
February 19th, 2013
Tags: Tools, LG
Kris Wetherbee
Hi Deborah. Sounds like you know all too well how destructive gophers can be as they chow down and destroy the plants in our yards. There are several things you can do to control their damage or completely exterminate them, with some being more effective than others. Non-toxic granular repellents are available using the urine of a feared predator such as the fox, or pellets of castor oil that release an odor gophers detest. The intent is to send these ravenous rodents packing, but that always isn't the case.

Permanent solutions include placing poison baits in the tunnel for the gophers to eat. The most effective tend to be made of strychnine or zinc phosphide. However, keep in mind that the poison will also kill any animal that eats the poison pellets or the poisoned gopher--including a family pet.

The method I prefer is trapping as it's one of the most effective ways to eliminate gophers without dealing with poisons. The key is to place the traps in an active tunnel. You'll need to dig down and dig out a space that's big enough to accommodate the traps. For best results, set two traps facing in opposite directions. (Be sure to wear gloves while handling the traps to avoid leaving any of your scent.) Finally, cover the hole with a board that you've secured to the ground to avoid light from seeping through. If all goes well the gopher will be trapped within a day or two. If the trap is still empty on day three, then move both traps to another active tunnel. Good luck!
by Kris Wetherbee |
February 21st, 2013
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