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Manage My Life
triming shrubs.
September 14th, 2011
Answered in 6 minutes
Manage My Life
Your local nursery is a great place to find that information. Your expert will help shortly. I did find alink that I attached below you may enjoy.
By Manage My Life
September 14th, 2011
MICHAEL CORONA
May 16th, 2008
Manage My Life
Shrubs are pretty difficult to kill time after time. It sounds like there's a major

problem that you need to figure out before planting any more.

The most likely problems are either too little water or you're planting shade-

loving plants in sunny areas or sun-loving plants in shady areas. Newly planted

shrubs need to be watered every two or three days for the first couple of weeks

and then once a week after that, if there's no rain for one week.

Plant that have too much shade for the type that they are get weak and spindly

over the time span of a few months and yellow leaves. They usually die out over

the winter.

Plants that have too much sun for the type that they are get sunburned leaves

that brown and it looks like it's shriveling up.

Without knowing much more, it's hard to recommend shrubs that you can't kill. If

you're still puzzled as to why your plants might be dying, I'd dig up one of the

dead shrubs and take it into a garden center so they can tell you what is going

wrong.
By Manage My Life
May 18th, 2008
Manage My Life
September 21st, 2010
Answered in 2 hours
Gary Becker
Greetings!
According to information I have read, your Alberta Spruce is rather intolerant of pruning. Confirmation of this fact is reported in a PDF file and referenced on page 618-3 just before the segment on pruning Pine. The document is from a University Master Gardener program. Please refer to the link below.
I would be cautious of trimming this shrub at all...
Best Regards!
By Gary Becker
September 21st, 2010
Manage My Life
April 26th, 2007
Manage My Life
Shrubs, trees or plants too close to the house can cause siding to be scraped or mechanically damaged when the wind blows. They can also prevent air and sunlight from drying wet siding. This can lead to moss, mold or rot. Trees too close, if tall enough, can overhang the roof and fill the gutters with leaves or needles. Large branches can scrape against the roof. Large, dead branches may fall, damaging the roof, gutters, siding or windows. Large trees close to the house may have roots that block or collapse sewers, or, in extreme cases, push in the foundation wall. Shrubs or trees too close to the house are the result of poor landscaping decisions or a lack of maintenance.

Check for damage where there is vegetation close enough to the house to have an effect. Often the only way to see if there has been any impact so far is to squeeze behind the plants. Look for scratching or denting, or mold and rot. Check horizontal surfaces carefully, and be aware of which side of the house you are on east and north sides tend to be more prone to moss and mold.
By Manage My Life
April 24th, 2008
Manage My Life
April 22nd, 2008
Manage My Life
You don't say where you live, but one guess is that it might be cold damage.

Boxwoods can be very tender, and frost damage on them can be quite random. If

they recover and are looking healthy (except for being somewhat misshapen by

the dieback), it's probably winter damage.

If they are in an exposed site, this winter consider covering them with burlap for

extra protection.

Another possibility is that your boxwood are suffering from something called

boxwood decline. Plants are weak and spindly and the dead branches are rather

random. Old foliage yellows and drops. Leaves may have pink and black marks and

cankers may form near at the base of the plant.

There's not a good "cure" for boxwood decline. However, nematodes may

contribute to the problem, so you can have your local extension office check for

nematodes.

Otherwise, if your plants are English boxwood, you may want to reconsider

replanting with American boxwood, which is more resistant.
By Manage My Life
April 25th, 2008
Manage My Life
May 17th, 2009
Manage My Life
Most recommendations call for planting only lawn over leach fields. You can get away with shallow-rooted flowers, too. I would not plant trees or shrubs. Do not add soil over the leach field; the soil microbes that break down the leachate require oxygen and may not do their job properly if the pipes are too deeply buried. You might try planting the area with a mixture of low-maintenance perennials, such as daylilies, coneflower, and black-eyed susans, for example. Be very careful if you till the area; till only shallowly.
By Manage My Life
July 8th, 2009
Manage My Life
August 7th, 2010
Answered in 28 minutes
Manage My Life
Bermuda grass does spread everywhere. I usually dig it up but it comes back. While you wait for the expert answer, you can check a website I found with good information. I attached below. Hope this helps!
By Manage My Life
August 7th, 2010
Manage My Life
July 14th, 2011
Answered in 3 hours
ERIN HYNES
Many people like arborvitea (the genus name is Thuja) for that use -- they're not exciting, but they do the job. They're widely available so you can get a pretty tall one affordably, and they grow several feet each year. Or you could plant one of the many many varieties of upright junipers. If you don't want an evergreen, a few good options are Tartarian dogwood (Baily's Nursery in St Paul has released a few to the market) or tri-colored willow (the cultivar name is 'Nakuro nishiki'. ---------- Here's a tip: head to the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum in Chanhassen, which has a terrific demonstration area of shrubs and another of evergreens used as hedges. See what appeals to you. That's one of the first things I did when I moved to Minneapolis in January 2000 (and by 'first thing" I mean the first weekend I was there) so I could see what looked good in winter).
By ERIN HYNES
July 14th, 2011
Manage My Life
April 27th, 2012
Answered in 2 hours
Manage My Life
The joys of dogs discovering gardens! This is a common complaint, easily fixed with management. To a dog, freshly planted shrubs are something new in his environment. They investigate. The plants smell good, the greenery and branches brush on their bodies - all of these things are attractive to dogs. Dogs who have a lot of energy and are inquisitive usually find chewing or pulling at the shrubs fun and rewarding. Rewarding because when they chew, the owner engages with the dog to get this to stop. No matter if it's good or bad attention, your dog is receiving attention. From a management standpoint, consider running garden fencing in front of or around your new shrubs. This prevents your dog from chewing and allows your dog to adjust to the new additions in your yard. Chewing and digging are also forms of boredom activities. Supervise your dog when it's out in the yard. Walk around the yard with your dog and as he/she investigates the plantings, call your dog and reward with a tasty treat making coming when called and leaving the plantings more rewarding. Provide enriching toys your dog only receives in the back yard. A Kong toy, stuffed with food and frozen can provide a good productive diversion that takes a long time to eat. Exercise outside of the yard to tire your dog out before spending time in the yard. A nice long walk before yard time might do the trick. I'm attaching a link with some management ideas. Good luck!
By Manage My Life
April 27th, 2012