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My chainsaw is leaking bar oil

I have a Craftsman chainsaw, Turbo, 2.5 ci in, model 358.356242 that is leaking bar oil.
It started about a month or so ago and is making a mess now.
I asked for help, with the tech support and the lady said something about clearing the vent, on the
flywheel side of the engine.
She suggested, that the oil vent might be clogged.
I was trying to find that vent.
She sent a diagram and said it was no.36, but I couldn't find it.
It looked a diagram of the other side.
I took the covers off of my chainsaw
Here are pictures of both sides.
Do I remove anything else to be able to see the vent, from the starter pully side?
I couldn't see a vent, on the fly wheel side.
Is there something else, that I should remove?
Also what do I use to clear the vent and how do
I use it?
Or would you suggest something else?
Thank You, Bert
This is the first time, that I've asked a question and I'm not sure where to find your reply.

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Chain Saws , Craftsman , Kenmore PRO Appliances
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10 Answers from these members:
Jerry C
Hello Bert,



I am happy to hear that this has solved the problem for you! Please come back to managemylife.com with your future needs.



Jerry C
by Jerry C Earned 317 community points in Craftsman
November 5th, 2012
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Manage My Life
Hi Jerry,
Well I am finally getting control of my leaves and have been using my Craftsman chainsaw again.
I tried to find the oil vent, but was unsucessful, but thanks to your pressure in the oil tank suggestion, I started opening the oil cap and the gas cap, in between cuttings, when the chainsaw is off.
I very happy to report, that it is not leaking oil anymore.
Thank you again for your help, Bert
by Manage My Life
November 2nd, 2012
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Jerry C
Hello Bert,



No worries, take whatever time you need, I'll be happy to assist you whenever you are ready. I know it is a big chore to clean up the leaves, but you are lucky to have such a beautiful fall scene in your yard!



Jerry C
by Jerry C Earned 317 community points in Craftsman
October 23rd, 2012
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Hello Jerry,
Thank you for answering all of the questions, that I had.
I'm sorry I didn't reply sooner.
I've been overwhelmed by all of the leaves, from the thirty or so
'eighty foot tall' maple and Oak trees, in my front and back yard.
You have answered ALL of the questions I asked, about finding out
why my chainsaw is leaking oil and now I can go through and check
each step.
As I had said, I live alone and I'm 68.
I've just been exhasted and when I come in, from the yard, all
I can do is eat alittle and sleep alot.
Thank You Jerry for taking the time to help me, with all of my
questions and getting my chainsaw running right again.
Here is a picture of some of the trees in just my back yard,
if you look near the bottom of the picture you can see my house.
If you don't mind, I will post the results of what I find out
on my chainsaw oil problem, as soon as I get this leaf problem
under control.
Thank You again Jerry, for all of your expert advice, Bert
by Manage My Life
October 23rd, 2012
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Jerry C
Hello Bert,



The symptoms that you are experiencing are pretty much the best test. To tell if the pump is working, hold the end of the bar and chain about an inch above a piece of wood with no bark. Rev the saw for a few seconds and you should see a little oil sling off the end of the chain and onto the wood. Most likely the pump is ok, if it wasn't oiling, the chain would have probably seized to the bar already. There is always the chance of oil flowing through the pump, there are no real check valves to stop it and most of the pumps are centrifugal in nature. I am quite sure that this leaking is due to normal heating and cooling of the ambient air temperature causing the reservoir to draw in air at night and then need to expel pressure during the day. It is possible that the pump is letting a little more oil out, but it is usually due to the reservoir being too full when you store the saw.



The pump is not difficult to replace, remove the clutch with your tool and then the pump is found behind it. Two screws and it can be removed. I am not sure that it will make a big difference though, unless the amount of oil in the reservoir is lowered or removed for storage. As to the vent for the reservoir, it is actually a check valve that is designed to let air in and not back out, it sounds like it is working normally. If it were not, oil would be leaking out of the bar oil reservoir cap, or it would not oil at all after enough oil came out that it vacuum locked. I think that prior to changing any parts I would store it with less oil and see how it turns out.



Jerry C
by Jerry C Earned 317 community points in Craftsman
October 15th, 2012
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Thank you Jerry C,
I guess what I am trying to determine, is if there a test or way, to tell if pressure biuldup it causing it to leak or if there is someway, that I can test it for a faulty oil pump?
In other words, how do I test, to see if the bar oil is lubricating the chain.
If I remove the clutch, 'could' I and 'how' would I determine if I have a faulty oil pump. Please step by step instructions.
When I first called the tech support 1 800 numberI the lady checked said something about clearing the vent, on the flywheel side of the engine. She suggested, that the oil vent might be clogged and that oil vent releases the pressure from the oil tank, when it biulds up.
When I was unable to find that oil vent, that she was talking about, she refered me to this help site.
I was thinking 'if' it was pressure biuld up, if I just stopped and removed the oil tank cap, every once and awhile, would that solve the leaking oil problem, due to pressure biuld up?
I never fill the gas and oil tanks, after using it and I alway saw and run it, untill I run out of gas.
Thank you for your help, Bert
by Manage My Life
October 13th, 2012
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Jerry C
Hello Bert,



You are on the right track with removal of the clutch, that is a very good improvised tool and I am glad that you have shared that with the other members of this forum. One thing that I wanted to mention is that a little bit of oil leakage is normal, especially with changing temperatures this time of year. The fill cap on the tank has a one way vent that will allow air in when the saw cools, but as things heat back up, the only way for the pressure to escape is through the pump and onto the floor! However, if there is a great increase in the amount of oil that is being leaked, I would suggest changing the pump because it is likely to be failing. If it is not a whole lot more than normal, it may be a good idea to not store the chainsaw with as much bar oil on the tank. I usually try to time the amount of oil in mine so it gets to 1/4 or so prior to finishing up what I am cutting. You will just have to decide if the leak is bad enough that you need to replace the pump, or if you just need to store it differently. I hope that this maybe gives you some other options.



I don't want you to have to spend the heating money that you have saved on parts for the saw, but on the other hand, I don't want you to have a faulty oil pump to cause you to have to also replace a chain and bar if it is not lubing correctly. In these times, any money saved is a big deal!



Jerry C
by Jerry C Earned 317 community points in Craftsman
October 12th, 2012
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Hello Jerry C,
Thank you very much for helping me try to solve my bar oil leaking
problem.
I had removed the metal plate over the two bolts, before and
cleaned behind it, when I was cleaning it up, so I could take a
picture of that side.
I just now removed that metal plate and took another picture of
what is behind it.
Please see attachment.
Would you please tell me what to do next, to maybe find out why it
is leaking oil and if the oil pump has failed?
I had removed the clutch before, on another chainsaw, by drilling
two holes, in a 1/8" thick by 1" wide, by about 2 feet long bar and
fitting in, two metal pins, the same distance as two knotches, inside
the clutch and used the bar as leverage and turning it clockwise and
also taking the spark plug out and filling the hole with nylon rope,
inside the top of the cyclinder head.
I don't have the sprocket for the clutch removal.
I'm 68 and live alone and try to use my chainsaw on the trees in my
woods each year, to use in my woodburning stove, to save a little money
on heating.
Thank You, Bert
by Manage My Life
October 12th, 2012
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Jerry C
Hello Bert,

I would like to answer your question about your chainsaw. I have attached notes to your second image that will assist you. Remove the screw from the middle of the metal plate. The plate can then be pulled off and any debris cleaned out. There is a pump that sits behind the clutch and it is #12 in the diagram. It is possible that your pump has failed and the oil just flows through it.

Please let me know if you would like any further assistance.

Jerry C
by Jerry C Earned 317 community points in Craftsman
October 11th, 2012
Answered in 23 hours
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Manage My Life
Taking care of the oil leak on the Craftsman chainsaw is important not only because its messy, but you want a chain saw that functions properly for many years to come. An expert will respond to your specific questions within 24-48 hours.
by Manage My Life
October 10th, 2012
Answered in 8 minutes
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