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Manage My Life

How do I turn off the freezer part of my refrigerator without turning off the fresh food compartment

by Manage My Life Last activity date:
December 10th, 2010

Model 253.55679407

Tags:
Refrigerators , Appliances
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Answers (7)
Fred M
If the ice does come back then give us a shout and we'll help you diagnose the problem. Have a happy Holiday.
by Fred M
December 10th, 2010
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Manage My Life
Fred,

You are right I did not explain what I wanted to do so it was not clear what was the best procedure. Thanks for the good suggestion. Fortunately, I had another refrigerator with an almost empty freezer where I placed all the frozen food while the freezer unit, now set on zero, was able to warm up slowly. After about five hours I found things had softened enough that I was able to remove the shelves which each had about 1/2 inch of ice on them. Other ice was also easy to remove at that time and we dried it out and left it for about another 8 hours when I turned the freezer back on and after about two hours I put the frozen food back in. So your idea that it might warm up if I turned the freezer off was correct and I was able to accomplish what I wanted. I don't see any evidence of a leak. The water and ice was a one time occurrence that happened one day and that is why I suspect that the freezer door had been left over for an extended period maybe on a day when we were away from early morning to late evening. I will keep watch to see if any other water or ice shows up. I do have the ice maker turned off right now (I have plenty of ice) and the problem may reoccur when I turn the ice maker back on so I will watch.

Thanks for your clear advice and I am sorry I did not clearly explain what I was trying to accomplish.
Answered in 22 hours
by Manage My Life
December 9th, 2010
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Fred M
Close is not good enough for an answer. I understand what you're trying to do now. The fastest way to do this is to simply turn the unit off so it doesn't run at all. Put the frozen food in the refrigerator section and leave the freezer door open. This is the fastest way to melt the ice block in the freezer. The ice block is most likely caused by an ice maker leak or a problem with the defrost heater or drain.

The refrigerator side will be like a large ice chest and nothing should thaw out in the amount of time (over night?) it takes for the ice to melt.

Adjusting the control might help but any change in the control settings take almost 24 hours to become noticed.

The ice might take days to melt by just adjusting the control settings.

The quickest way to melt the ice is to turn off the unit and leave the freezer door open and use the refrigerator side as an ice chest. A hair dryer will also be helpful to speed things up.

There is a defrost heater in the freezer section that may be malfunctioning.
Answered in 21 hours
by Fred M
December 9th, 2010
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Manage My Life
It turns out that the manual doesn't tell you what to do, customer service will not help because of liability questions and the "experts" (I had two answers from them don't really understand how to turn off the freezer while leaving the refrigerator on. I have to admit though that Fred M. comes close. There are two dials in my side by side refrigerator, one for the freezer and one for the fresh food section. The manual tells you you have to set them both to zero and that will turn of both the freezer and the refrigerator but no where does it say how to turn off the freezer. Well, as the "experts" say in fact you can't. But all I wanted to do was to warm up the freezer enough so the huge ice build up that had formed for some unknown reason (I suspect the freezer door got left ajar) would melt and I could get it out of there. It turns out that setting the freezer control to zero does not seem to have any effect for several hours and you still feel cold air blowing into the freezer. But if you wait a few more hours you will see signs that there is enough melting going on that you can get the ice out and remove the shelves. I believe what happens is that the temperature of the freezer warms up to approximately the temperature of the fresh food section allowing one to slowly melt the ice build up. So Fred is pretty close to giving a solution to this problem but this info should have been somewhere in the manual and the experts should have been able to give a clear answer to this question.
Answered in 19 hours
by Manage My Life
December 9th, 2010
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Fred M
The refrigeration section gets all the cooling from the freezer section.

There is no way to turn the freezer off and still have a working refrigerator.

The best you could do is to turn the freezer controls to the freezer is the warmest it can be.
Answered in 17 hours
by Fred M
December 9th, 2010
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Manage My Life
I have gone through the manual in great detail and the answer to my question is not there. I called Sears and they refused to answer my question because of some liability issue. I have house full of Kenmore appliances and as I replace them I will be looking for another brand.
Answered in 21 minutes
by Manage My Life
December 8th, 2010
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Joseph Perez
I know that the last thing you want for your refrigerator is very important so that your food will stay nice and fresh. While you are waiting for an expert answer, I recommend you look in your owners manual for specific instructions about how to adjust the temperature in your refrigerator. I found a link in where you can enter your model number and your owners manual will pop up. I hope my link is useful.
Answered in 11 minutes
by Joseph Perez
December 8th, 2010
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