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Kenmore elite HE3

I have replaced thermostats, thermistors, thermal fuses several times. Dryer works fine for several cycles and stops heating. What's the problem, please.

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Dryers , Kenmore , Washers
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18 Answers from these members:
Manage My Life
It would be disheartening to make all those repairs and then have the same problem reappear. If you have the dryer model number and add it to this thread, it will help the expert provide a better answer. In the meantime I found a previous expert post with some other things that can go wrong if you wish to check it out. I attached the link below.
by Manage My Life
January 27th, 2011
Answered in 6 minutes
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Lyle W
Since you indicated that you replaced the thermal fuse for a heating problem, I assume that you have a gas dryer. Check the gas supply cut-off valve to make sure that it is fully open. Make sure that you have an adequate gas supply provided to the dryer.

The wiring diagram for a gas HE3 dryer is shown in the image below with the heating circuit traced in red. A number of problems could be preventing the dryer from heating. You could have a failed wiring connection, a bad heater relay on the control board, a blown thermal fuse (do to an unresolved exhaust vent restriction), a bad high limit thermostat, a defective flame sensor, a bad igniter or a problem with the motor centrifugal switch.

I recommend that you check the thermal fuse first. This is the most common failure in the heating circuit of a gas dryer. If that fuse is blown again, I recommend that you carefully examine the exhaust air flow system for a clog or restriction. Also, wash the lint screen with water and a soft bristle brush. Fabric softener can build up on the lint screen and restrict exhaust air flow.

You can order parts from the

Sears PartsDirect

website.

These tips may help you resolve this dryer problem. If you have an electric dryer or need more assistance, reply with additional details and the full model number of your HE3 dryer.

If you do not feel confident repairing this problem yourself, then you can have it repaired at your home by a Sears technician. Here is a link for the website:

Sears Home Services

.
by Lyle W Earned 136,254 community points in Kenmore
January 28th, 2011
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Manage My Life
I must have put the model # in the wrong box- 110.82822102 (electric). Where is the control board and how do I test it. I have 4" metal ducting, approx. 25' w/an auxilliary blower. This dryer has worked fine for approx. 5 yrs. until this problem arose several months ago.
Thanks
by Manage My Life
January 28th, 2011
Answered in 20 hours
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Lyle W
Thanks for providing that model number. The control board on this dryer is shown in the second image below. The first image shows the wiring diagram for your electric dryer. I recommend that you UNPLUG the dryer and check the wiring harness connections on the control board. You could have a loose connection causing this problem. When the dryer is not heating, you may need to check the resistance of the thermistor (temperature sensor) shown in the third image. Use a volt/ohm meter that is set to the proper scale to make this check. There is a possibility that you could have a voltage problem through your house electrical system. You may need to check the voltage at the dryer outlet when the dryer is not heating. The 4th image below show how to check the dryer outlet. NOTE: Use extreme care when you make this type of live voltage check at the dryer outlet. If you are not completely confident in your technical ability to safely measure that live outlet voltage, I recommend that you have an electrician or technician check it. A problem with the heater relay, the high limit safety thermostat or the motor centrifugal switch could also cause this heating problem. I hope that this additional information helps. If you need more assistance, reply with additional details.
by Lyle W Earned 136,254 community points in Kenmore
January 28th, 2011
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Lyle W
Here is the 4th image. NOTE: Be sure that you UNPLUG the dryer when accessing internal components.
by Lyle W Earned 136,254 community points in Kenmore
January 28th, 2011
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Manage My Life
OK, Lyle, I now have this thing in pieces. The "tech" guy was here today and proved useless. Soooo... how do I test the control board, and what is the centrifugal switch. The thermal fuse is reading .001 on the ohm meter, the thermistor is 1., the thermostat toward the back of the heating element is 1., and the one in the front is .001. I have replaced each of these twice. Voltage to thre dryer is good, and the element is good. Where to from here. My wife is tired of line drying.
Thanks
by Manage My Life
February 1st, 2011
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Lyle W
Check your settings on the meter when testing the thermistor. It should read about 10K ohms (10,000) ohms at room temperature. You may need to check that component again. You did not mention the heating element resistance. Check the resistance of that component. It should measure between 7.8 and 11.8 ohms. To test that heater relay, you will need to conduct a live voltage check when the dryer is running to see if you are getting the L1 leg of voltage out of the control board. I normally don't recommend that you conduct live voltage checks. These tests are normally conducted by a service technician. If you are completely confident that you can safely check the voltage, then you can start the dryer in a heated cycle with the bottom front service panel and heat shield in front of the heating element removed. Do not touch any wires or contacts when you are running the dryer with the internal components exposed. Check to see if the heating element is glowing. If not, check the voltage going to the heating element. You should measure around 240 volts. The wiring diagram is shown in the image below with the voltage paths to the element traced. The L1 leg is traced in red and the L2 leg is traced in green. If you are getting 240 volts then the element is bad. If you are getting only 120 volts then one of the legs is bad. Unplug the dryer immediately after this test. You can check the voltage coming directly out of the control board if necessary to see if the control board is working. The centrifugal switch is difficult to check. If you can access the motor, you can manually engage the centrifugal switch and then check for continuity (near zero ohms of resistance) through the contacts 1M and 2M on the motor. I hope that these additional tips help. Reply with additional details if you need more assistance.
by Lyle W Earned 136,254 community points in Kenmore
February 2nd, 2011
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Manage My Life
Honey, I'm home. All checks out positive, except the thermal cut-off. It's reading 1 on the ohm meter. I seem to remember that not being a good sign when going through this exercise prior to one of my previous repairs. Does this narrow it down to the control board. How do I check voltage coming out. If all else checks out ok, is it safe to put it back together and order a control board. Remember, it's still in pieces, and my wife's still hanging clothes.I also noticed a substantial amt. of lint in the windings of the motor.
Thanks
by Manage My Life
February 2nd, 2011
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Lyle W
As long as the thermal cut-off reads close to zero ohms of resistance, it is okay. If it reads Ol (open load or infinite resistance) then it will need to be replaced. I assume that you read the proper resistance through the thermistor (10 K ohms). To check voltage coming out of the control board, you would need to unplug the red wire off of the COM connection of the heater relay on the control board (with the dryer unplugged). Tape the end of that red wire so that it does not short against the cabinet. Start the dryer in a heated cycle and check for 120 volts between the COM spade on the control board and the white neutral wire on the control board. The red wire has to be disconnected or you could read the 120 volt L2 leg through that red wire. If the control board heater relay is not closing and sending the 120 volt L1 voltage to the heating element then you will need to replace the control board. NOTE: You should only conduct this live voltage check if you are completely confident in your technical ability to safely measure it. If you need more help, reply with additional details.
by Lyle W Earned 136,254 community points in Kenmore
February 3rd, 2011
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Manage My Life
Ok, I'm getting 120v at that connection, which means the board is fine, right? But still no heat. I get no voltage at the element w/the red wire at the COM connection re-connected. What else could it be.
Thanks
by Manage My Life
February 3rd, 2011
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Lyle W
Since you are getting voltage out of the control board, that components is good. I recommend that you unplug the dryer and pull the L2 wire off of the element and tape the end of it with electrical tape so that it won't short to the metal cabinet. This will prevent you from L2 voltage during the following tests. Check for voltage at the thermal cut-off fuse (see the electric wiring diagram in the previous response in this thread). If you do not have voltage at the thermal cut-off fuse then you have a wiring failure in the circuit. If you do have voltage at the thermal cut-off fuse, check for voltage at the high limit thermostat. Continue to check voltage in that manner all of the way to the heating element to determine where you are loosing voltage. NOTE: These live voltage checks are extremely dangerous. They are normally performed by a service technician. If you are not completely confident in your technical ability to safely perform the voltage checks, I recommend that you have a service technician diagnose and repair the dryer. These additional checks may help you determine the cause of your heating failure. Reply with additional details if you need more help.
by Lyle W Earned 136,254 community points in Kenmore
February 4th, 2011
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Manage My Life
Thanks. No voltage at the thermal cut-off fuse. What next.
by Manage My Life
February 5th, 2011
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Manage My Life
OK, so I just by-passed both the high limit thermostat & the thermal cut-off and voila, heating element works. What say you.
Thanks
by Manage My Life
February 5th, 2011
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Lyle W
Since you bypassed the thermal cut-off fuse and the high limit thermostat and the element is heating, I recommend that you replace those 2 components. With those components bypassed, you can also disconnect the vent so that the dryer vents directly in the laundry room. Fill the dryer with a medium load of wet laundry. Ventilate the laundry room and run the dryer on a heated cycle briefly with it venting directly into the room. Check the temperature of the air coming out of the exhaust vent at the back of the dryer with an accurate thermometer. The dryer should cycle from about 140 to 160 degrees on high heat. If the dryer is not cycling the heating element on and off properly then you could still have a problem with the thermistor (temperature sensor) or the control board. If the dryer cycles properly then replacing the thermal cut-off fuse and high limit thermostat should fix this problem. If you need more help, let us know. NOTE: Do not continue to run the dryer with those components bypassed.
by Lyle W Earned 136,254 community points in Kenmore
February 7th, 2011
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Manage My Life
Thanks, but I think I'm back where I started. I have replaced these parts twice before already, along w/the thermal fuse and thermistor. The dryer will work fine for several cycles and stop heating again. I will check the temperature at the exhaust, but in anticipation of the same result, is there another possibility.
by Manage My Life
February 7th, 2011
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Lyle W
If the dryer is in an environment where the ambient temperature is extremely low, then it could be taking a long time for the thermistor to warm up. This could possibly cause the dryer to overheat. If the dryer is in a climate controlled laundry space then this should not be a problem. If the resistance of the thermistor is okay then you could have a bad control board. You did not indicate that you replaced the electronic control board in the dryer. You may also need to check the heating element for damage. Based on your symptoms, the heating element seems to be okay but if it is shorting to the metal cabinet, it may be causing your problem. You can UNPLUG the dryer and check the resistance between each terminal of the heating element and the bare metal cabinet next to the heater box to see if you detect resistance. You should measure infinite resistance or Ol -- open load during this test. If you measure a resistance reading then the element will probably need to be replaced. If you need more help, reply with additional details.
by Lyle W Earned 136,254 community points in Kenmore
February 7th, 2011
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Manage My Life
The dryer is in a laundry room (80-85 deg.). What should the resistance on the thermistor be. I have not replaced the control board. I will check the element/cab resistance.
Thanks
by Manage My Life
February 7th, 2011
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Lyle W
The temperature/resistance chart for the thermistor is shown in the image below. At 80 degrees, the resistance should be about 9.2K ohms (9,200 ohms) +/- 3%. At 85 degrees, you should measure around 8.3K ohms.
by Lyle W Earned 136,254 community points in Kenmore
February 7th, 2011
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