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Manage My Life

WIRING DIAGRAM FOR OVEN THERMOSTAT

by Manage My Life Last activity date:
June 14th, 2011

I NEED A WIRING DIAGRAM FOR A ROBERTSHAW OVEN THERMOSTAT. THE NUMBERS ON THE UNIT ARE
P-15942-66 AND 9950930 AND PN46. I THINK IT IS FOR A SEARS/FRIGIDAIRE OVEN.
IT HAS SEVEN BRASS CONNECTION POINTS. I NEED TO KNOW WHICH TWO CONNECTORS I SHOULD USE TO CONTROL A SINGLE 115V ELEMENT.
WIRING DIAGRAM?
THANKS,
WAYNE PHILLIPS IN TEXAS

Tags:
Frigidaire , Wall Ovens , Appliances
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Answers (12)
Manage My Life
Joey:
I received a detailed .pdf file from Robertshaw describing the thermostat. The unit I have is in the drawing marked "Typical Wiring". This site will not upload a .pdf file. If you can send me an emai address, I can forward the file to you to look at. Just wondered if you would have any additional suggestions based on the drawings.
Thanks,
Wayne
by Manage My Life
June 14th, 2011
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Manage My Life
Thanks for your help.
Wayne
by Manage My Life
June 14th, 2011
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Joey S
Wayne: Placing the end of the thermostat bulb in boiling water would be a accurate way of knowing where 212 degrees would be on the thermostat plus you will be able to tell if contacts L1 and B3 opens when it reaches the set temperature.
by Joey S
June 14th, 2011
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Manage My Life
Joey:
The only terminal which shows contact (zero ohms) with L1, when the knob is turned clockwise, is B3. The rest show infinite resistance with L1 when the knob is turned fully clockwise or counterclockwise. So, I assume I should use L1 and B3 as my contact closures. I guess the next test is to see if the L1/B3 contact opens when the temperature probe reaches the temperature set on the knob Any suggestions on how to test the temperature probe? Maybe submerge it in some boiling water (212 degrees)?
Thanks,
Wayne
by Manage My Life
June 14th, 2011
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Joey S
Wayne: You must look at the thermostat as a switch. It makes and breaks contact as needed to bring on the element when needed. When the thermostat closes it completes a path of voltage to the heating element. Since your using a 120 volt heating element you are basically going to wire the L1 side of the voltage supply to L1 and then I can't be sure which other terminal will make and complete the circuit when it closes. You will need to use an ohm meter to find out which other terminal is closing to L1 terminal. The thermostat you have is not your average oven thermostat. The L1 or L2 will most likely be one of the terminals to connect your power supply to but I would have no idea which other terminal would make contact and complete the circuit without using an ohm meter to check for continuity. You will only need to find which two terminals makes and breaks contact when the thermostat calls for heat and when it opens once it reaches the set temperature. If you not sure how to figure which two contacts/terminal make and break you may want to have someone with knowledge of how the thermostat works and has an ohm meter to figure it out for you.
by Joey S
June 14th, 2011
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Manage My Life
Joey:
Maybe this will help:
On the back there are four screw-type brass connectors. These four are labeled
B3, L1, L2. The fourth one has no label but has a screw in it screwed to a metal piece.
There are three tab-type (push-on) connectors labeled BU and a 5 next to it
BR and a 7 next to it, the third one has no label, but an 8 next to it.
Does this help?
Thanks,
Wayne
by Manage My Life
June 13th, 2011
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Joey S
Wayne: Thanks for the image but the image you sent is way too small to see. If you could enlarge the image and also take a shot of the terminal side so that I can make out the letters next to each terminal it would help.
by Joey S
June 13th, 2011
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Manage My Life
Here is a photo of the oven thermostat.
Wayne
by Manage My Life
June 13th, 2011
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Joey S
Wayne: I could not find an image of the thermostat in order to see the how the terminals are labeled. It's odd that a thermostat would have that many terminals. It almost sounds like a selector switch more than a thermostat. If you can you take a digital photo of the front and back of the thermostat may be I can help.
by Joey S
June 13th, 2011
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Manage My Life
I purchased this thermostat on Ebay. I intend to use it on a BBQ smoker. I do not know what range/oven it was used in. Any ideas?
Thanks,
Wayne in Texas
by Manage My Life
June 13th, 2011
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Joey S
Thank you for your question and I understand your concern.

In order to provide a model specific wiring diagram I will need to have the model number of the range/oven.

Reply with the model number of the range/oven for the model specific wiring diagram.
by Joey S
June 13th, 2011
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Manage My Life
Parts and wiring for older appliances can be difficult to find with supporting information. If you could also add the model number of the oven it may help the expert provide a better answer. In the meantime, you might try the link below for more information on this thermostat for stoves.
Answered in 14 minutes
by Manage My Life
June 11th, 2011
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