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Manage My Life

Kenmore wall oven repair.

by Manage My Life Last activity date:
August 4th, 2011

A previous question proved that the heating elements are not the problem with the oven not heating. One of the responses makes me believe that the control board is bad. Question, the parts blow up of the Kenmore 79047842401 shows only two parts, the control panel and the clock timer. The control panel seems to be only the buttons that you push to operate the oven while the clock timer has all the relays, transformers and power connections. Wouldn't the fact that the oven looks like it is working, but in fact will not heat be more likely a problem with the clock timer or the control panel? Are there readings I can take with a multimeter to decide what is the actual problem? I don't want to spend over $200.00 for a part only to find out it is not the problem and I can't send it back.

Tags:
Kenmore , Wall Ovens , Appliances
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Answers (3)
Sam A
Thank you for your question on the oven not working.

You have input voltage onto the clock timer control board for the oven relays.

Since you have a multi-meter and know how to use it I we can do some checks on the back of the electronic oven control.

If you measure the voltage on the In Line 2 terminal on the control board across to the K1 terminal on the board you should have 240 volts + or -.

BE VERY CAREFUL CHECKING THE RANGE WITH THE VOLTAGE ON

.

Make sure to set your meter to a 240 volt ac scale before put your red and black probes on these two terminals.

Then check with the oven programmed to bake and check on the out terminal on the board to see if you have the same voltage. It you have the voltage coming in to the board but not out of the board the control board is bad and will need to be replaced.

There will be 120 volts to the elements at all times and the control board completes the circuit with the other 120 volts.

If you do not have 120 volts going to the IN terminal on the control, the safety themostat may be open behind the back panel of the oven. It is directly in line with the control board and line (L2) of the power in.

To get to the safety thermostat (FUSE) you will need to take the wall oven completely out of the wall so you can remove the bake panel. You can check the resistance through the thermostat with the power off on the oven and your meter set on the resistance setting and OHM out the safety thermostat.

Please let me know what you have found, and we can continue our troubleshooting based on that.

Thank you for using Manage My Life.

Sam A.
by Sam A
August 4th, 2011
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Manage My Life
Both of the links above have to do with gas ovens. This one is electric and the broiler does not work either.
Answered in 16 minutes
by Manage My Life
August 2nd, 2011
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Manage My Life
A non working Oven is not something any of us want to see. If you are technically handy, this is a good site to get instruction and fix some things yourself. If you do not feel confident doing your own repairs, an option is to visit Sears Home Services and use the scheduler. While you wait for the expert to review your model, you can check the bottom links for some possibilities. Hope this is of help.
Answered in 10 minutes
by Manage My Life
August 2nd, 2011
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