?
Manage My Life

This is a tip.... I save heating energy by redirecting the exhaust from our clothes dryer into the "crawl space " under the house during winter months.....

When I installed our clothes dryer,...I installed two dryer exhaust outlets.....one is thru the wall to the outdoors ( summer ) and the other goes into a 4" pipe that exhausts into the "crawl space" under the house..,..and I switch them in the spring and fall......just like my snow tires... In winter,....when my wife uses the clothes dryer....that's 6000 watts of heat that heats the floor instead of being wasted outdoors....

Tags
Dryers
Sign in to answer a question
5 Answers from these members:
Manage My Life
Joe - Good idea but if you are not worried about the humidity in the crawl space why bother? Should you decided to go ahead may I offer a couple of suggestions. 1. Instead of 4" PVC why not use 4" galvanised ducting. The reason I suggest this is that PVC is not a very good conductor of heat, steel is. you will get a much better rate of heat transfer. 2. Should you be able to arrange some sort of 'finning' on the 4" pipe, your rate of heat transfer will increase dramatically. The finning will have to be in contact with the pipe as much as possible to get the best results. 3. I know I only said two suggestions but this follows from the use of galvanised pipe, do not weld the finning to it inside unless your have a properly ventilated booth, on e of the 'ingredients' of the 'smoke' that comes off is arsenic and you do not want to be breathing that.
by Manage My Life
February 10th, 2012
Comment
0 votes
Manage My Life
Good tip there "biguggy" In my case....it exhausts to an "earth floor area." which sucks up the moisture..... Many persons run a "humidifier" inside the home during winter to put moisture into the air....,They seem to think it makes the heat more effective... I could attach the hose to a 4 " PVC pipe which would run the length of the house and exhaust outdoors....allowing the heat to radiate thru the pipe walls, yet capturing the humidity..establish a 1/2 " pvc drainpipe from the 4 " back to the condensate pump for my central A.C. unit...........sounds like a summer project...
by Manage My Life
February 10th, 2012
Comment
0 votes
Manage My Life
I fully agree with what Sam is saying. You may actually be in the category of 'short term gain for long term gain', UNLESS your crawlspace is that 'dry' it can absorb all the moisture that the dryer removes from the laundry an pushes out of its exhaust. I once did a similar thing not into a crawl space but into the basement but I did not exhaust the dryer directly into the basement I passed it through a disused window A/C unit and let the cooled exhaust from that exhaust outside. That used to bring the basement temperature up in a hurry, and very cost effect as well, only snag was I had no facility for a drain, I had to have a bucket under the A/C unit and empty it regularly. A lot of people I demonstrated it to were amazed at how much water the A/C unit took out and when I explained that a dehumidifier performed the same function most were mystified, a few 'caught on'.
by Manage My Life
February 10th, 2012
Comment
0 votes
Sam A
Thank you for the tip on the clothes dryer heating the crawl space under the house. It is nice to have warm floors.

My only concern with that is all the humidity it is putting under your house.

Have you looked under the house after a series of dryer load to see if there is condensation and frost forming on the under pinning and the floor joists.

It may not be an issue in this environment where you live in the cold climate.

Thank you for your input.

Sam A.
by Sam A
February 10th, 2012
Comment
0 votes
Manage My Life
I know this type of information can be very helpful to have. Your expert will answer within 24-48 hours with detailed information. Thank you for using Manage My Life.
by Manage My Life
February 9th, 2012
Answered in 24 minutes
Comment
0 votes
Didn't find what you are looking for? Ask a question